How to Cook with Duck Confit

Duck leg confit is a signature D’Artagnan product, and a vital ingredient in our cassoulet recipe kit. But there are many other ways to eat and enjoy this French favorite. What is confit? Confit is a French word that means “preserved,” and is a method of slow cooking food – and storing it – in fat. This…

Snacks for Emmy Awards Viewing

If you’re watching the Emmy Awards on Sunday night, what will you be eating? We like a quick, easy and elegant charcuterie plate for entertaining and snacking (plus it goes so well with wine). To learn more about how to lay out the perfect plate, read our post about a well-balanced charcuterie board. Add a…

New Arrival: Chicken Leg Confit

We love duck confit, and based on the popularity of this item, it’s likely that you do, too. That’s why we decided to make confit with everyone’s favorite bird: chicken. We are excited to introduce the first chicken leg confit on the market. Confit is a (pronounced kuhn-fee) specialty from the heart of Gascony, in…

Offally Good – From Nose to Tail

Can it really be true? Is offal finally considered mainstream? Will we all be eating brains for dinner? Kate Krader reports for Bloomberg in this compelling article. Chef Chris Cosentino is a master of offal, the non-primal cuts from an animal, and one of its biggest proponents in the United States. In fact, his restaurant Cockscomb in San…

People Are Talking About Duck Leg Confit

We love duck leg confit. There, we admitted it. We consider duck confit fast food at its best. Slow-cooked until tender, it is sold ready-to-eat, so you need very little prep. Find our recipes for duck leg confit, and also duck rillettes (shredded duck leg confit that is spreadable), a cousin to confit. What is…

Make Bastille Day Party Plans

Feasts, fêtes and fireworks are the traditional ways to celebrate Bastille Day, the national day of independence in France. And where there are parties, there is food. While there is no traditional food associated with Bastille Day, many choose to eat peasant food in a nod to the proletariat nature of the uprising that Bastille…

Recipes for a Summer’s Day

Happy summer! Since today is the first day of summer, we are looking ahead to all the glorious eating in store this season. Whether it’s a weekend cookout or a weeknight supper, we tend to eat lighter and fresher in the summer. Here are a few recipes to get you in the mood for leisurely…

The Negroni: Food Pairings

It’s Negroni Week, a fundraising event since 2013, and the internet is going wild for this Italian specialty. A simple drink with 3 ingredients, no shaking needed, the Negroni is a love-it-or-hate-it kind of cocktail. This funny article by Fiona Beckett sums up the attitudes toward this drink quite nicely. Drinking Negronis puts you in an…

All About D’Artagnan Mousse

Mousse is a French word meaning “lather” or “foam.” It can refer to a foamy hair product, or a decadent chocolate dessert. But let’s not get confused by chocolate mousse here. The mousse at D’Artagnan is definitely savory in nature. When we say mousse, we mean liver mousse–an emulsified liver product, with a light, airy…

Not Just for Charcuterie Plates: 3 Ways to Enjoy Smoked Duck Breast

D’Artagnan Smoked Duck Breast may be the best fast food! Keep some in the fridge for those quick weeknight dinners and last-minute lunches. We’ve done all the work of smoking duck for you (though that is a fun cooking project to try at home), so this piece of tasty charcuterie is ready-to-eat. Our smoked duck…

What to Do With Ventrèche

What is ventrèche? Very simply, it is an unsmoked, salt-cured bacon from Southwest France, where it is a staple. Pronounced vohn-tresh, it is often referred to as “French pancetta.” Ventrèche is made from pork belly (ventre means belly in French) that has been rubbed with salt, spices and garlic before hanging to dry. It can be kept in…

6 Ways to Serve Sausage

At D’Artagnan we love all things sausage. This humble food, often made from trimmings and offal, is one of the most beloved bits of charcuterie, and perhaps the oldest. The first sausage recipes date to before the golden age of ancient Greece, and traditional sausages have been made for over 2000 years in both Rome…