Our Best-Kept Secret for Eating Foie Gras

Pssst… we’re going to let you in on a kitchen secret. When you want foie gras but don’t need perfect, symmetrical slices, our foie gras cubes are the solution. These foie gras trimmings have the same rich flavor and silky texture of a whole, grade-A lobe of foie gras but at a fraction of the…

How to Make Compound Butter in Minutes with 5 Sure-Fire Recipes

Compound butter takes only minutes to prepare and makes everything it touches better. You can whip up this classic French accompaniment by combining butter with almost anything: fresh herbs, ramps, citrus zest, spices, mushrooms, chilies, miso, or roasted garlic. We even made foie gras butter (so worth it!). Use this simple technique to add flavor…

Do these 5 Things for the Perfect Easter Ham

Are you making ham the wrong way? It seems like there’s nothing easier than heating a ham, but there are still plenty of ways to get it wrong (think Aunt Mary’s dried-out ham). Our simple tips will make all the difference when cooking your ham this Easter, and guarantee a memorable meal – for all…

Heirloom Flavor: Cooking with Tarbais Beans

What’s so special about Tarbais beans? Brought from the New World, the Haricot Tarbais flourished at the foot of the Pyrénées in Southwest France, and its cultivation secrets were passed down from generation to generation. Today the farmers that carry the tradition forward produce beautiful white heirloom beans of outstanding quality. These distinctly French beans are…

Spread the Love: Making an Epic Charcuterie Board

We consider charcuterie an instant party and a must-have at the holidays. Charcuterie is simple to serve and makes a beautiful presentation when paired with fruits, nuts, cheeses of all kinds, chutneys, pickles, olives, honey, and truffle butter. D’Artagnan offers a selection of charcuterie, such as smoked duck breast, saucisson sec, jambon de Bayonne, duck…

Cook This Now: Milk-Braised Pork Shoulder

Apparently, it’s an Italian thing – maiale al latte – and especially well-suited to pork. Braising in milk seems a bit unusual, but the lactic acid in the milk tenderizes the pork and allows it to soak up all the flavors. It starts like any other braise: sear the pork on all sides, then reduce the heat…

What to do with Thanksgiving Leftovers

First and foremost, be sure to save all the turkey bones to make stock. Easy to do, and so much more satisfying than store-bought stock. Once you have turkey stock, you can use it for all sorts of soups, including this famous turkey chili soup recipe from Al Yaganeh, known as the Soup Nazi on Seinfeld….

How to Carve a Turkey Like a Pro

So much time is spent planning the cooking for of Thanksgiving, but there’s also the carving and serving of the turkey to consider. Once the object of attention is done roasting, there’s a flurry of activity while it rests (you do let the turkey rest?) and you pull everything else together. That is not the…

Thanksgiving Help: Download Our Turkey Roasting Guide

Cooking Thanksgiving dinner can be an intimidating task, especially if you aren’t experienced. How often do we get to practice roasting a turkey? With the large turkey taking up so much time in the oven and all the side dishes to orchestrate, it’s no wonder the average home cook can be overwhelmed by the task….

Thanksgiving Cooking: Pan Gravy Secrets

Nothing is better for dressing a turkey than delicious, old-fashioned pan gravy.  Some people think the whole meal is just an excuse to make gravy. Pan gravy derives its flavor and character from a rich stock, and the wonderful juices and dripping fats from the roasting bird that collect in the pan. Read on for an…

How to Truss a Turkey

Trussing is a means of binding a bird before cooking, to hold the wings and legs close to the body. This gives the bird a compact shape, often enhancing the symmetry in the process; and making for more even cooking, a beautiful presentation, and simplified carving.   Some recipes call for turning a bird during…

Should You Brine Your Turkey?

When it comes to preparing Thanksgiving turkeys, there are two camps: the briners and the anti-briners. What is brining? At its most basic, brining is submerging meat in a solution of salt and water for many hours before cooking. The purpose is to enhance the meat’s ability to retain moisture and tenderness while seasoning it….