Don’t Know Much About Squab? Start Here

We were delighted to see this illustrated primer on squab in the NY Times by Tony Wolf, tracing it from Ancient Egypt to Delmonico’s. In our opinion, we all need to eat more squab. Did you know that for thousands of years squab has been the favorite meal for every stratum of society throughout the world?…

Fowl Language: All About Game Birds

Have you experienced game birds yet? What are you waiting for? Get in the game! Game birds are smaller – and quicker cooking – than chicken; plus they offer richer flavors and a change from the monotony of everybody’s favorite bird. D’Artagnan has offered fresh game birds since the early days. Back then, Ariane, the…

Plums + Bacon + Squab = Yummy!

Spotted in the September issue of Bon Appetit, this vibrant radicchio, plum (and bacon!) salad reminds us of a recipe Marcus Samuelsson made with Ariane: Squab with Bacon-Wrapped Plums & Frisée (and romaine lettuce hearts cooked in bacon fat). We think squab would work well with the raddichio and plum salad, too. The colors would be gorgeous….

A Salad Post (Scandalous!)

You don’t have to double check – this is the D’Artagnan blog, and you did just read the word “salad.” We are known as hardcore carnivores, but we are hungry omnivores with an appreciation for a well-composed salad. As long as there is some meat on it. And it’s summer  – the perfect time to try…

Saucy Series, Part VI: Sauce Cameline

Welcome to guest blogger Deana Sidney of Lost Past Remembered, a blog dedicated to discovering, replicating and adapting historic recipes. In this saucy series she demystifies one of the cornerstones of classic French cuisine: the mother sauces. Sauce Cameline Sauce Cameline was like the ketchup and barbeque sauce of the Middle Ages. It was a cinnamon-y…

All About Squab

Squab are young pigeons that have never flown. For thousands of years, they have been a favorite meal for every stratum of society throughout the world. They were unequivocally the first domesticated poultry, even preempting chicken. This may surprise twenty-first century Americans. More often we think of pigeons as annoying denizens of city monuments and buildings….